News

Transportation of oversized parts to the new Champlain Bridge

The construction strategy of the new Champlain Bridge relies primarily on fabricating pieces off-site and then delivering them to the site. This allows us to work simultaneously on several fronts, and to assemble the pieces on different work platforms.

These pieces are manufactured in different plants in Quebec and are generally oversized in terms of dimensions and weight. Considering that new load limitations have been imposed on certain provincial and federal infrastructures over the past year, including notably the Turcot Interchange and the Champlain Bridge, we had to adapt our strategy to limit transportation by road, opting for greater use of marine and rail transport. 

The moment this situation was identified, we made every effort to minimize the impacts related to this logistical reorganization. We are working in collaboration with all stakeholders to find solutions.

In addition, in August 2016, we held a technical briefing for the media, where we explained the challenges linked to transporting pieces requiring special permits.

 

Info on parts manufactured off-site
that require special transportation permits
:

Concrete segments: 360

  • Segments destined for the main pylon’s lower cross beam: 44
  • Pier segments destined for approach:  316
  • Typical dimensions: 1.5m/8.5m/4.9m or 3.3m/5.1m/3.5m
  • Weight: 30 to 75 metric tons

 

Steel Box girders: 600

  • Box girders destined for the superstructure of the new Champlain Bridge’s approaches
  • Typical dimensions: 3.3m/35.5m/3.1m or 4.4m
  • Weight: 40 to 80 metric tons

 

As appropriate, the segments and box girders fabricated off-site are delivered by road, barge or rail. Several of these pieces have already been transported to the site, and deliveries will continue in the coming months.

We are making every effort to address this challenge. Our objective to deliver the bridge on December 1, 2018, remains unchanged; a high quality bridge that Montrealers, Quebecers and Canadians will be proud of.

Your comments

May we suggest